Questions and Answers

We get a lot of questions about menu items, and you can check below to find the answers to some questions you might have:

What is “Bao Ze”?

Bao Ze is a bread or dough cake with a very tasty stuffing. The shape of a Bao Ze makes it look like a slightly flattened onion. The stuffing is either a chopped beef and vegetable mix or sweet red bean paste. This is a very popular appetizer or snack item in China. They are cooked in a steamer. In China this item available just about anywhere at any time of the day either in restaurants or from street vendors.

What is “Pao Tai”?

Pai Tai is a mix of pickled Vermont vegetables in a juice that Ping Wang has originated to give it a very unique and tasty flavor. This is another menu item that is quite popular in China, mostly at the dinner table. A generous serving of Pao Tai is available to everyone at the table, and people take portions as they eat from other entrées to add to and enhance the other flavors they are enjoying.

What are “Pot Stickers”?

The stuffing for pot stickers is a combination of chopped pork, several different vegetables, and spices. A pot sticker start out as a circular piece of flattened dough. The stuffing is placed in the middle, the dough is folded over and then the edges are pinched together. The pot sticker is first steamed and then it is fried to make the outer skin crisp. Most people enjoy them dipped in soy sauce.

What is “Madam Wang’s Sweet Shrimp”?

This menu item is named for Ping Wang because the sweet sauce the shrimp are cooked in originated with her. As is true for many of the sauces that are prepared for a variety of her menu items, her recipe is a well guarded secret.

What is so special about Ping’s Chow Mein?

The quality of any chow mien preparation very much depends on the noodles used tgo make it. Ping looked in many locations to find noodles that met her requirements and was unsuccessful.

In China there is an incredible variety of noodles available in small stores and supermarkets everywhere. Noodles are very much a part of the daily diet in China. Small wonder that Marco Polo returned from his journeys with some recipes and samples that eventually became what the Western world knows as “spaghetti”.

Ping decided that her only recourse to having noodles that were just right for her chow mien dishes was to make them herself. She starts every day in her kitchen by making enough hand rolled noodles to satisfy that day’s demand.

What is “Gung Bao Ji Ding”?

This is a chicken entree that is meant to be served spicy – with small pieces of red chili peppers in the sauce. We will be asking when people order this item to make sure that we get the spice level to match individual taste, so you won’t have to worry about having more of a spice level than you like.

The sauce has chopped scallions in it along with peanuts, and is a quite popular dish the world over.

What is “Sao Bei”?

This is probably a dish that is not well know to our American customers, and it is indeed a delicacy. It is prepared from a cut of pork meat very much like bacon. The meat is prepared along with a unique vegetable – dried mustard leaves – in a steamer. The meat and the leaves are steamed for several hours in order to bring the combination to the correct tenderness and taste.

The initially prepared serving can be refrigerated until ordered, at which time it is re-steamed to bring it the the right temperature and taste. Anyone who has never sampled this tasty dish is in for a rare treat when they give it a try.